| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact us |  
top_img
Korean J Parasitol > Volume 5(3):1967 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1967 Dec;5(3):153-158. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1967.5.3.153
Copyright © 1967 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
The Incidence of parasites found of vegetables
Won Young Choi and Kwon Chang
Department of Parasitology, Catholic Medical College, Korea.
Abstract

The high incidence of intestinal parasites among the Korean people almost same as 40 years ago might be partly interpreted by the fact that they are all fond of raw vegetables cultivated on the farms fertilized with non-treated night soil. The cabbages, onions and radishes were collected from the five areas of Seoul vicinity and the number of parasites attached to those vegetables were investigated to compare with the results obtained 10 years ago by the same methods of sampling and examination as the present survey. The resultant findings were summarized as follows: The eggs of Ascaris, hookworm, Trichostrongylus and whipworm, rhabditoid larvae and filariform larvae of hookworms were detected from those vegetables. Additionally, a number of larvae of free living nematodes and morphologically undetermined eggs were also observed. The maximum number of parasites found from one vegetable were as follows: 16 Ascaris eggs on a cabbage, 27 hookworm eggs on an onion, 8 whipworm eggs on a cabbage, 68 filariform larvae of hookworm on an onion. The onions were highly contaminated by the number of parasites as much as 177.6 including the larvae of free living nematodes, the next being the cabbages with 25.3 and the radishes with 4.1 in average. No notable relationship was observed between the size of vegetables and the number of parasites attached to them. Ascaris eggs were found from 56 percent of all cabbages, 28 percent of the onions and 40 percent of the radishes; whipworm eggs were detected on 40 percent of radishes and the filariform larvae of hookworms were observed from 40 percent of onions examined. It may be concluded that there is no notable change in the number of parasites attached to the vegetables collected from the Seoul vicinity compared to the results investigated by the same method 10 years ago.

Tables


Table 1
Mean weight of 10 vegetables according to gathered areas


Table 2
Parasitic eggs and larvae attached to vegetables according to gathered areas


Table 3
Mean number of parasite eggs and larvae according to the kind of vegetables


Table 4
Total number of parasite eggs and larvae according to gathered areas


Table 5
Rate of attachment of parasite eggs and larvae according to the kind of vegetables


Table 6
Comparison of the parasite eggs and larvae attached to vegetables between present data and those of 10 years ago

References
1. Mills RG. China Med J 1911;15:277–293.
Editorial Office
c/o Department of Medical Environmental Biology
Chung-AngUniversity College of Medicine, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 06974, Korea
Tel: +82-2-820-5683   Fax: +82-2-826-1123   E-mail: kjp.editor@gmail.com
About |  Browse Articles |  Current Issue |  For Authors and Reviewers
Copyright © 2018 by The Korean Society for Parasitology and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved.     powerd by m2community