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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 29(2):1991 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1991 Jun;29(2):139-148. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1991.29.2.139
Copyright © 1991 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Isolation and identification of Cryptosporidium from various animals in Korea. I. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in various animals
J K Rhee,Y S Seu and B K Park
Department of Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Korea.
Abstract

Cryptosporidium, a coccidian protozoa, commonly causes a self-limiting diarrheal illness in humans and animals. Fecal samples from various animals in Chonbuk district were observed using Sheather's flotation technique, Kinyoun's modified acid-fast staining, and osmic acid pre-fixed Giemsa staining. The oocysts were detected in 74 cages (29.6%) out of 250 cages of mature mice, 26 (13.3%) out of 195 mature house rats, 75(15.0%) out of 4-week-old 500 fowls, 98(19.9%) out of 6 to 8-month-old 500 pigs, and 111(22.2%) out of 2 to 5-year-old 500 dairy cattle, respectively. The degree of prevalence was slight in general, but actual prevalence was higher than infection rate because the detection rates were higher in repeated-preparation examinations in comparison to the first examination. Meanwhile, large and small types of oocysts were detected from mice, house rats, pigs, and cattle, and medium type from fowls.

Figures


Figs. 1-4
Fig. 1. Large (arrow) and small (triangle) types of Cryptosporidium oocysts concentrated from feces of infected mice by sugar centrifugal floatation method, ×670.

Fig. 2.Cryptosporidium oocysts concentrated from feces of infected chicken by sugar centrifugal floatation method, ×500.

Fig. 3. Large type of Cryptosporidium oocysts from mice, osmic acid pre-fixed Giemsa staining, ×1,675.

Fig. 4.Cryptosporidium oocysts from chicken, osmic acid pre-fixed Giemsa staining, ×1,675.



Figs. 5-8
Fig. 5. A HE-stained paraffin section of the stomach of a moue infected with large type of Cryptosporidium. Most gastric glands of the pars glandularis are filled with large numbers of the protozoa, ×1000.

Fig. 6. A HE-stained paraffin section of the bursa of Fabricius of a chick infected with Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidia of various stages are attached to the surface of the lining epithelial cells, ×1600.

Fig. 7. A scanning electron photomicrograph showing the parasites in the pit of the gastric glands of a mouse infected with large type of Cryptosporidium, bar=10µm.

Fig. 8. A scanning electron photomicrograph showing large number of the parasites on the villous epithelial surface from the ileum of a cattle infected with Cryptosporidium, bar=10µm.


Tables


Table 1
Effect of repeated-preparation examinations on detection rates of Cryptosporidium oocysts in swine


Table 2
Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in mice


Table 3
Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in house rats


Table 4
Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in fowls


Table 5
Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in swine


Table 6
Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in dairy cattle


Table 7
Dimensions of Cryptosporidium oocysts in various animals (Kinyoun modified acid-fast staining preparations)


Table 8
The number of Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in feces

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