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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 22(2):1984 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1984 Dec;22(2):259-266. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1984.22.2.259
Copyright © 1984 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Ultrastructural observation of Naegleria fowleri trophozoite in mouse brain and axenic culture
Jae-Sook Ryu,Chin-Thack Soh and Kyung-Il Im
Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine and Institute of Tropical Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

Present study was undertaken to elucidate the changes of the ultrastructure of Naegleria fowleri trophozoite in brain tissue of mice and culture medium. Naegleria fowleri, 0359 strain, which used in this study was cultured in axenic liquid medium, CGVS medium. Each mouse was inoculated with 1 × 10(5) amoebas intranasally under secobarbital anesthesia, and sacrificed on 7th day after the infection. Comparative observation of the ultrastructure of the amoebas in axenic culture and experimentally infected mice brain was done with transmission electron microscope. The results are summarized as follows: The amoebas in mouse brain tissue were round in outline, whereas those of amoebas from axenic culture showed irregular appearance. Mitochondria in the amoebas from axenic culture was oval, round and cylindrical shape and darkly stained, whereas those of the amoebas from mouse brain tissue showed dumbbell shape together with above forms. The stain was not unique, but light and/or dark. Rough endoplasmic reticulum of amoebas in brain tissue was tubular, but from culture it was vesicular or tubular in shape. Empty vacuoles were demonstrated in amoebas from culture, while food vacuoles with myelinated structures were abundant in those from tissue, suggesting a strong phagocytic activity. Mouse brain tissue infected were extensively destroyed, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were infiltrated predominantly with inflammatory lesion. Amoebas were observed in the vicinity of the capillary.

Figures


Figs. 1-4
Fig. 1.N. fowlerii trophozoite cultured showing two nuclei (N), vesicular endoplasmic reticulum (VER) and pseudopodial extension (P) (×7,500).

Fig. 2.N. fowlerii trophozoite cultured showing two nuclei (N), darkly stained mitochondria (M) (×12,500).

Fig. 3.N. fowlerii trophozoite cultured showing vacuole that is containing the particulated material (V) (×15,000).

Fig. 4.N. fowlerii trophozoite cultured showing vesicular endoplasmic reticulum (VER) and various shapes of mitochondria (M) (×10,000).



Figs. 5-8
Fig. 5.N. fowlerii trophozoite observed in the mouse brain tissue. The amoeba is enclosed partially by two polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and contained dumbbell shaped mitochondria (M) (×10,000).

Fig. 6.N. fowlerii trophozoite observed in the mouse brain tissue showing polysome and autophagic vacuole (AV) (×25,000).

Fig. 7.N. fowlerii trophozoite observed in the mouse brain tissue. The amoeba, that is partially disintegrated, is engulfed by a leukocyte (×12,500)

Fig. 8.N. fowlerii trophozoite observed in the mouse brain tissue showing the vacuole and its axonal contents (×20,000).


Tables


Table 1
Ultrastructural characteristics of Nagleria fowleri trophozoite

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