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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 4(2):1966 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1966 Dec;4(2):23-34. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1966.4.2.23
Copyright © 1966 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Experimental studies on the effects in helminthic infection, with special reference to the gonadectomy of the host
Kun Ho Paik
Department of Parasitology Yonsei University Medical College Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

No significant difference was noted in canine hookworm infection due to hormone influence between the control group and the gonadectomized rats which were sacrificed 17 days after gonadectomy and 7 days after the infection. However in the rats which were infected 20 days after oophorectomy a significant difference was thought to be present in this group(176 ± 12.9 larvae/rat) compared with the control group (138 ± 21.2 larvae/rat). On the other hand, in the castrated group the number of larvae (138 ± 37.1 larvae/rat) was less than that in the control group (208 ± 43.4 larvae/rat). In the estrogen-injected male and female groups, there were no difference compared to the control, but the testosterone-injected groups of males and females showed more susceptibility to infection by A. caninum than in the control group. The Capillaria hepatica infection to the castracted host showed no significant difference between the gonadectomized and the control group. (oophorectomy; 214 ± 28.0), castration; 250 ± 36.5 and control; 191 ± 58.2 and 270 ± 30.1 adults/rat). Concerning the influence of the host's sex hormone on egg production of canine hookworm, there was a significantly decreased egg production in castrated dogs(6,578 ± 664.0 egg per gram) compared to the control dogs(9,711 ± 1,322.3 egg per gram). The same results were observed in vitro test. In the host, the susceptibility to hookworm infection was reduced in castrated rats, while oophorectomy group had a little or no effect. In the favorable or unfavorable hosts, testosterone gave the tendency of increasing susceptibility of the host to infection, while estrogen did a little or no effect.

Figures


Fig. 1
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum from female dog with ovarectomy (A total of 500 infective larvae per dog was infected).


Fig. 2
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum from male dog with castration (A total of 500 infective larvae per dog was infected; The data were average from two dogs).

Tables


Table 1
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from female mice with ovarectomy and ligation of uterine tube


Table 2
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from male mice with castration and vasectomy


Table 3
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from mice with removal of reproductive organs


Table 4
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from female mice treated with sexual hormones


Table 5
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from male mice treated with sexual hormones


Table 6
Detection of the Capillaria hepatica from mice with removal of reproductive organs


Table 7
Detection of the Ancylostoma caninum from dog with removal of reproductive organs or treated with sexual hormones


Table 8
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum from female dog with ovarectomy


Table 9
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum from male dog with castration (I)


Table 10
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum from male dog with castration (II)


Table 11
Egg production rate (E.P.G.) of Ancylostoma caninum in test tube

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