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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 4(2):1966 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1966 Dec;4(2):7-13. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1966.4.2.7
Copyright © 1966 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Studies on transaminase reactions in some parasitic helminths
Yong Ok Min and Byong Seol Seo
Department of Parasitology and Institute of Endemic Diseases College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Korea.
Abstract

By an application of Sigma-Frankel methods, two transaminase systems, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, were found to operate at a mesurable rate in 2 species of nematodes(Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaridia galli), 5 species of trematodes (Clonorchis sinensis, Fasciola hepatica, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Paramphistomum cervi and Paragonimus westermani) and 5 kinds of cestodes (Diphyllobothrium mansoni, Dipylidium caninum, Taenia pisiformis, Cysticercus cellulosae and Cysticercus pisiformis).

A comparison was made of the transamination reactions in nematodes and those of trematodes and cestodes. And the significance of transaminase in these parasites is discussed in relation to protein synthesis and its utilization.

Tables


Table 1
Transaminase activity of 2 species of nematodes. Values are micromole of amino acid formed per gram wet weight of worms per hour


Table 2
Transaminase activity of 5 species of trematodes. Values are micromole of amino acid formed per gram per hour


Table 3
Transaminase activity of 5 species of cestodes. Values are micromole of amino acid formed per gram wet weight of worm per hour


Table 4
Transaminase activity in the fluid species of 3 kinds of helminths. Values are micromole per mg nitrogen per hour

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