| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact us |  
top_img
Korean J Parasitol > Volume 36(2):1998 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1998 Jun;36(2):109-119. English.
Published online Jun 20, 1998.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1998.36.2.109
Copyright © 1998 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Intestinal mastocytosis and goblet cell hyperplasia in BALB/c and C3H mice infected with Neodiplostomum seoulense
J Y Chai,*T K Kim,W H Cho,M Seo,J Kook,S M Guk and S H Lee
Department of Parasitology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, Korea.
Received February 25, 1998; Accepted April 14, 1998.

Abstract

Mucosal mast cell (MMC) and goblet cell (GC) responses were observed in the small intestine of two strains of mice (BALB/c and C3H) infected with Neodiplostamum seoulense, and their roles in the host defense and worm expulsion were studied. From day 3 to 28 post-infection (PI) with 200 metacercariae, the worm recovery rate from BALB/c mice was consistently and remarkably higher than that from C3H mice. In the duodenum of both strains of mice, the main habitat of the flukes, mastocytosis was pronounced on day 7 PI but quickly diminished thereafter. Similar kinetics were observed in the jejunum and ileum, although the extent of mastocytosis was lesser in the ileum than other two areas. These MMC kinetics were not different between the two strains of mice. Moreover, the extent of mastocytosis was stronger in BALB/c mice than in C3H mice. GC hyperplasia was remarkable in the duodenum of BALB/c mice throughout the course of infection except day 14 PI, whereas it was recognizable only in the jejunum and ileum of C3H mice on day 7 PI. Mucin activation was evidently demonstrated in both strains of mice throughout the course of infection, but more marked in BALB/c than in C3H mice. The results strongly suggest that mastocytosis and GC hyperplasia are local immune responses against N. seoulense, however, they play a minor role in the host defense and worm expulsion.

Figures


Fig. 1
Comparison of mucosal mast cell (MMC) numbers per 10 villus-crypt unit (VCU) in the small intestine of BBALB/c and C3H mice infected with N. seoulense. Values represent the mean of data from 5 mice each consisting of three samples on each day. Standard deviation rarely exceeded the mean value.


Figs. 2-3
Fig. 2. Mucosal mastocytosis in the duodenum of a BALB/c mouse infected with N. seoulense, day 7 PI. Blue spots represent MMCs. Stained with alcian blue and safranin. ×500. Fig. 3. Decreased number of MMCs to nearly normal level on day 21 PI in the duodenum of a BALB/c mouse infected with N. seoulense. ×500.


Fig. 4
Comparison of goblet cell (GC) numbers per 10 villus-crypt unit (VCU) in the small intestine of BALB/c and C3H mice infected with N. seoulense. Values represent the mean of data from 5 mice each consisting of three samples on each day. Standard deviation never exceeded the mean value.


Figs. 5-6
Fig. 5. The duodenum of a normal BALB/c mouse showing only a small number of GCs (arrows). Stained with PAS, and counterstained with hematoxylin. ×500. Fig. 6. Marked GC hyperplasia in the ileum of a BALB/c mouse infected with N. seoulense, day 28 PI. Dark spots (arrows) represent GCs. ×650.


Fig. 7
Comparison of Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) positive cell numbers per 10 villus-crypt unit (VCU) in the small intestine of BALB/c and C3H mice infected with N. seoulense. Values represent the mean of data from 5 mice each consisting of three samples on each day. Standard deviation never exceeded the mean value.


Figs. 8-9
Fig. 8. The duodenum of a normal BALB/c mouse showing only a small number of activated GCs (arrows) in which altered mucins around GCs are stained dark brown. Lectin histochemistry was performed using Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) which specifically recognizes the terminal GalNAc residue on altered GC mucins. ×500. Fig. 9. HPA positive GCs (arrows) in the ileum of a BALB/c mouse infected with N. seoulense. day 28 PI. Lectin histochemistry was performed by the same procedure as in Fig. 8. ×650.

Tables


Table 1
Comparison of the WRRs from BALB/c and C3H mice infected with N. seoulense

References
1. Abe T, Sugaya H, Yoshimura K. Different susceptibility to the IL-3 induced-protective effects between Strongyloides ratti and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in C57BL/6 mice. Parasite Immunol 1993;15(11):643–645.
  
2. Abe T, Sugaya H, Yoshimura K, Nawa Y. Induction of the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti and retention of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in athymic nude mice by repetitive administration of recombinant interleukin-3. Immunology 1992;76(1):10–14.
 
4. Chai JY, et al. Study on Metagonimus yokogawai(Katsurada, 1912) in Korea V. Intestinal pathology in experimentally infected in albino rats. Seoul J Med 1979;20:104–117.
5. Chai JY, Kim TH, Kho WG, Chung SW, Hong ST, Lee SH. Mucosal mast cell responses to experimental Metagonimus yokogawai infection in rats. Korean J Parasitol 1993;31(2):129–134.
  
6. Chai JY, Seo BS, Lee SH. Study On Metagonimus Yokogawai(Katsurada, 1912) In Korea Vii. Susceptibility Of Various Strains Of Mice To Metagonimus Infection And Effect Of Prednisolone. Korean J Parasitol 1984;22(2):153–160.
 
7. Cho SY, et al. Trematodes parasites of korean terrestrial snakes. Chung-Ang J Med 1983;8:13–28.
8. Fujino T, Fried B, Tada I. The expulsion of Echinostoma trivolvis: worm kinetics and intestinal cytopathology in conventional and congenitally athymic BALB/c mice. Parasitology 1993;106(Pt 3):297–304.
  
9. Fujino T, Ichikawa H, Fried B, Fukuda K. The expulsion of Echinostoma trivolvis: suppressive effects of dexamethasone on goblet cell hyperplasia and worm rejection in C3H/HeN mice. Parasite 1996;3(3):283–289.
 
10. Hammarstrom S, Kabat EA. Purification and characterization of a blood-group A reactive hemagglutinin from the snail Helix pomatia and a study of its combining site. Biochemistry 1969;8(7):2696–2705.
  
11. Hong SJ, Lee SH, Seo BS, Hong ST, Chai JY. Studies On Intestinal Trematodes In Korea: IX. Recovery Rate And Development Of Fibricola Seoulensis In Experimental Animals. Korean J Parasitol 1983;21(2):224–233.
 
12. Hong ST. Studies On Intestinal Trematodes In Korea: VII. Growth, Development And Recovery Of Fibricola Seoulensis From Experimentally Infected Rats And Mice. Korean J Parasitol 1982;20(2):112–121.
 
13. Hong ST, Chai JY, Lee SH. Ten human cases of Fibricola seoulensis infection and mixed one with Stellantchasmus and Metagonimus. Korean J Parasitol 1986;24(1):95–97.
 
14. Hong ST, Cho TK, Hong SJ, Chai JY, Lee SH, Seo BS. Fifteen human cases of Fibricola seoulensis infection in Korea. Korean J Parasitol 1984;22(1):61–65.
 
15. Hong ST, Shoop WL. Neodiplostomum seoulense, the emended name for Neodiplostomum seoulensis. Korean J Parasitol 1995;33(4):399.
  
16. Ishikawa N. Histochemical characteristics of the goblet cell mucins and their role in defence mechanisms against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection in the small intestine of mice. Parasite Immunol 1994;16(12):649–654.
  
17. Ishikawa N, Horii Y, Oinuma T, Suganuma T, Nawa Y. Goblet cell mucins as the selective barrier for the intestinal helminths: T-cell-independent alteration of goblet cell mucins by immunologically 'damaged' Nippostrongylus brasiliensis worms and its significance on the challenge infection with homologous and heterologous parasites. Immunology 1994;81(3):480–486.
 
18. Jarrett EE, Jarrett WF, Urquhart GM. Quantitative studies on the kinetics of establishment and expulsion of intestinal nematode populations in susceptible and immune hosts. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in the rat. Parasitology 1968;58(3):625–639.
  
19. Kang SY, Cho SY, Chai JY, Lee JB, Jang DH. A Study On Intestinal Lesions Of Experimentally Reinfected Dogs With Metagonimus Yokogawai. Korean J Parasitol 1983;21(1):58–73.
 
20. Kho WG, et al. Mucosal mast cell responses to experimental Fibricola seoulensis infections in rats. Seoul J Med 1990;31:191–199.
21. Koninkx JF, Mirck MH, Hendriks HG, Mouwen JM, van Dijk JE. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: histochemical changes in the composition of mucins in goblet cells during infection in rats. Exp Parasitol 1988;65(1):84–90.
  
23. Miller HR, Huntley JF, Wallace GR. Immune exclusion and mucus trapping during the rapid expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis from primed rats. Immunology 1981;44(2):419–429.
 
24. Miller HR, Jarrett WF. Immune reactions in mucous membranes. I. Intestinal mast cell response during helminth expulsion in the rat. Immunology 1971;20(3):277–288.
 
25. Mimori T, Nawa Y, Korenaga M, Tada I. Strongyloides ratti: mast cell and goblet cell responses in the small intestine of infected rats. Exp Parasitol 1982;54(3):366–370.
  
26. Nawa Y, Ishikawa N, Tsuchiya K, Horii Y, Abe T, Khan AI, Bing-Shi, Itoh H, Ide H, Uchiyama F. Selective effector mechanisms for the expulsion of intestinal helminths. Parasite Immunol 1994;16(7):333–338.
  
27. Seo BS. Fibricola seoulensis Seo, Rim and Lee, 1964 (Trematoda) and fibricoliasis in man. Seoul J Med 1990;31:61–96.
28. Seo BS, Lee SH, Hong ST, Hong SJ, Kim CY, Lee HY. Studies On Intestinal Trematodes In Korea: V. A Human Case Infected By Fibricola Seoulensis (Trematoda: Diplostomatidae). Korean J Parasitol 1982;20(2):93–99.
 
29. Strobel S, et al. Human intestinal mucosal mast cells: Evaluation of fixation and staining techniques. J Clin Pathol 1981;34:851–858.
  
30. Uber CL, et al. Expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis by mice deficient in mast cells. Nature 1980;287:226–228.
  
31. Wakelin D. Allergic inflammation as a hypothesis for the expulsion of worms from tissues. Parasitol Today 1993;9:115–116.
  
32. Woodbury RG, et al. Mucosal mast cells are functionally active during spontaneous expulsion of intestinal nematode infections in rats. Nature 1984;321:450–452.
 
Editorial Office
Department of Molecular Parasitology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University,
2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon 16419, Gyeonggi-do, Korea.
Tel: +82-31-299-6251   FAX: +82-1-299-6269   E-mail: kjp.editor@gmail.com
About |  Browse Articles |  Current Issue |  For Authors and Reviewers
Copyright © 2022 by The Korean Society for Parasitology and Tropical Medicine.     Developed in M2PI