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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 34(1):1996 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1996 Mar;34(1):59-68. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1996.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1996.34.1.59
Copyright © 1996 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Localization and characteristics of lactate and malate dehydrogenase in the sparganum and adult worm of Spirometra erinacei
Kee-Hoon Kwak,Eun-Woo Cheon and Chang-Hwan Kim*
Department of Biology, College of Natural Sciences Gyeongsang National University, Chinju 660-701, Korea.
Received November 27, 1995; Accepted December 22, 1996.

Abstract

This study investigated the enzyme histochemical localization and characteristics of lactate (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) related with the oxidation-reduction metabolism in the sparganum and adult of S. erinacei. By enzyme histochemical assay, activity of LDH was strong in the tegument and subtegumental muscle layers of the adult and sparganum. Activity of MDH was strong in the tegument of the sparganum and subtegumental muscle layers of the adult. However it was weak in the tegument of the adult. By electrophoresis, 45 kDa band was major and common in LDH of adults and spargana. The 150 kDa molecule was the major and common band in MDH of adults and r-spargana (from experimentally infected rats). By isoelectrofocusing, isoelectric points (PI) of 4 MDH isozyme from adult worm were 6.0, 6.5, 6.7 and 7.1, respectively. PI 6.0 was the major band. The active range of pH for MDH was about pH 6 approximately 8 and the optimum pH was pH 7. The effective temperature on the MDH was about 30℃ approximately 50℃ and the optimum temperature was about 40℃ in spargana and adult worm. In the stability against heat, when MDH was heated at 85℃ for 10 seconds, the activity was denatured perfectly. Maximum activity of MDH was 19.4 unit in the s-sparganum (from snakes), 24.5 unit in the r-sparganum (from rats) and 108.0 unit in the adult worm. The maximum activity was higher in adults than in spargana. The present result showed us that the nutrients absorbed through the tegument were transferred into inner tissues and were utilized as the source of metabolism. According to the habitat of the parasite, the isozymes of LDH and MDH are activated differently, and by this different activation the sparganum and adult can adapt themselves to parasitic circumstances.

Figures


Fig. 1
Histochemical localization of lactate dehydrogenase on the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei. a. Snake sparganum (80 ×), b. Snake sparganum (400 ×), c. Rat sparganum (80 ×), d. Rat sparganum (400 ×), e. Immature proglottid (80 ×), f. Immature proglottid (400 ×), g. Mature proglottid (80 ×), h. Mature proglottid (400 ×), i. Gravid proglottid (80 ×), j. Gravid proglottid (400 ×). T, tegument; SM, subtegumental musculature; PM, parenchymal musculature; CC, calcareous corpuscles; TS, testis; V, vitelline gland; EG, egg; N, nerve trunk; LM, epidermal longitudinal musculature; GP, genital pore.


Fig. 2
Histochemical localization of malate dehydrogenase on the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei. a. Snake sparganum (80 ×), b. Snake sparganum (400 ×), c. Rat sparganum (80 ×), d. Rat sparganum (400 ×), e. Immature proglottid (80 ×), f. Immature proglottid (400 ×), g. Mature proglottid (80 ×), h. Mature proglottid (400 ×), i. Gravid proglottid (80 ×), j. Gravid proglottid (400 ×). T, tegument; SM, subtegumental musculature; PM, parenchymal musculature; CC, calcareous corpuscles; TS, testis; N, nerve trunk.


Fig. 3
Isozyme patterns of lactate dehydrogenase on the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei. SS, snake sparganum; RS, rat sparganum; AD, adult; TD, tracking dye; kDa, kilo-dalton; M, marker protein.


Fig. 4
Isozyme patterns of malate dehydrogenase on the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei. SS, snake sparganum; RS, rat sparganum; AD, adult; TD, tracking dye; kDa, kilo-dalton; M, marker protein.


Fig. 5
Isozyme patterns of malate dehydrogenase by IEF no the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei. TP, Coomasie blue staining of total protein(adult); PI, isoelectric point; M, marker protein; AD, adult.


Fig. 6
The stability against heat treatment on the isozmy of malate dehydrogenase in adult worm, heating at 85℃ for 10, 20, 30, 40s seconds, respectively. 0, control; 10, 10 sec.; 20, 20 sec.; 30, 30 sec.; 40, 40 sec.


Fig. 7
The effect of pH on the activity of malate dehydrogenase in r-sparganum and adult worm. ●—●, adult; ○—○, sparganum


Fig. 8
The effect of temperature on the activity of malate dehydrogenase in r-sparganum and adult worm. ●—●, adult; ○—○, sparganum

Tables


Table 1
Relative amount of lactate dehydrogenase activity on the sparganum adult worm of S. erinacei


Table 2
Relative amount of malate dehydrogenase activity on the sparganum adult worm of S. erinacei


Table 3
Enzyme activities of malate dehydrogenase on the sparganum and adult worm of S. erinacei (mean ± SE)

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