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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 33(3):1995 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1995 Sep;33(3):201-210. Korean.
Published online Sep 20, 1995.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1995.33.3.201
Copyright © 1995 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Detection of Toxoplasma antigens and antibodies in mice infected with different strains of Toxoplasma gondii
Y H Lee,*K Y Kim,M S Kang and D W Shin
Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Taejon 301-131, Korea.
Received August 21, 1995; Accepted August 31, 1995.

Abstract

This study aims to assess the possible strain-dependent variations in detection of Toxoplasma antigens and antibodies. The virulent RH strain or avirulent Beverley strain of T. gondii were injected into mice, intraperitoneally, and their antigens, antibodies and parasites were identified from the blood or tissues; liver, brain and spleen by ELISA, Western blot and PCR. In mice infected with RH strain, circulating antigens and parasitemia were first detected from 2 days after infection, and Toxoplasma DNA were found in the blood, liver, brain and spleen from 3 days after infection. It was impossible to detect specific IgM and IgG antibodies to T. gondii, and any specific band was not found by Western blot. In mice infected with Beverley strain, circulating antigens were detected between day 10 and day 35. The Toxoplasma DNA was found in the blood and liver from day 15 until day 60, and in the brain from day 20. But Toxoplasma DNA in the spleen were mainly detected between day 10 and day 30. The IgM antibodies were first appeared on day 10 post-infection, and were noted obviously increased between day 15 and 25. The IgG antibodies were first detected on day 15, and showed progressively increased titers. The antibody binding bands were specific according to infection period. Sera from mice infected with Beverley strain reacted mainly with the antigen of 27.5-kDa and 32.5-kDa. In conclusion, mice infected with RH strain revealed Toxoplasma antigens strongly, but not antibodies. However, mice infected with Beverley strain revealed both the Toxoplasma antigens and antibodies. The present results showed that immune responses are different between avirulent and virulent T. gondii.

Figures


Fig. 1
Detection of circulating antigens(•), specific IgM antibodies(▪) and IgG antibodies(▴) in the sera of mice infected with RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Each point represents the mean ± S.D. of 5 mice, except day 6 post-infection.


Fig. 2
Detection of circulating antigens(•), specific IgM antibodies(▪) and IgG antibodies(▴) in the sera of mice infected with Beverley strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Each point represents the mean ± S.D. of 5 mice, except day 6 post-infection.


Fig. 3
Time course of the IgG immunoblot patterns of sera samples from mice infected with the RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii. Lane 1, molecular weight standard (kDa); 2, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 3-14 (days after infection): 3 and 4, 1; 5-7, 2; 8-10, 3; 11 and 12, 4; 13, 5; 14, 6.


Fig. 4
Time course of the IgG immunoblot patterns of sera samples from mice infected with the Beverley strain of Toxoplasma gondii. Lane 1, molecular weight standard (kDa); 2, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 3-42 (days after infection): 3 and 4, 5; 5-7, 10; 8-12, 15; 13-16, 20; 17-21, 25; 22-26, 30; 27-31, 35; 32-35, 40; 36-39, 50; 40-42, 60.


Fig. 5
Detection of T. gondii DNA from blood (panel A) and liver (panel B) in mice infected with the RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Lane 1, λ-Hind III marker; 2, negative control; 3, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 4-10 (days after infection): 4, 1; 5, 2; 6, 3; 7, 4; 8, 5; 9 and 10, 6. Lane 11, 123-bp marker ladder.


Fig. 6
Detection of T. gondii DNA from brain (panel A) and spleen (panel B) in mice infected with the RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Lane 1, λ-Hind III marker; 2, negative control; 3, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 4-10 (days after infection): 4, 1; 5, 2; 6, 3; 7, 4; 8, 5; 9 and 10, 6. Lane 11, 123-bp marker ladder.


Fig. 7
Detection of T. gondii DNA from blood (panel A) and liver (panel B) in mice infected with the Beverley strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Lane 1, λ-Hind III marker; 2, negative control; 3, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 4-13 (days after infection): 4, 5; 5, 10; 6, 15; 7, 20; 8, 25; 9, 30; 10, 35; 11, 40; 12, 50; 13,60. Lane 14, 123-bp marker ladder.


Fig. 8
Detection of T. gondii DNA from brain (panel A) and spleen (panel B) in mice infected with the Beverley strain of Toxoplasma gondii during course of infection. Lane 1, λ-Hind III marker; 2, negative control; 3, serum of normal mouse. Lanes 4-13 (days after infection): 4, 5; 5, 10; 6, 15; 7, 20; 8, 25; 9, 30; 10, 35; 11, 40; 12, 50; 13,60. Lane 14, 123-bp marker ladder.

Tables


Table 1
Detection of circulation antigens and specific antibodies in the sera of mice infected with RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii


Table 2
Detection of circulation antigens and specific antibodies in the sera of mice infected with Beverley strain of Toxoplasma gondii

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