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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 31(4):1993 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1993 Dec;31(4):301-313. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1993.31.4.301
Copyright © 1993 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Transmission electron microscopic ultrastructure of the tegument of Fibricola seoulensis
W M Sohn,*1 and S H Lee2
1Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Pusan 614-735, Korea.
2Department of Parasitology and Institute of Endemic Diseases, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, Korea.
Received September 25, 1993; Accepted October 19, 1993.

Abstract

An electron microscopic study was performed to observe the ultrastructure of the tegument of F. seoulensis. The outer surface of the tegument was covered with a trilaminated plasma membrane. The electron-dense cytoplasmic layer was 2.5 µm wide in the anterior portion and contained numerous vacuoles, mitochondria and granular materials in its matrix. The basement layer was 330 nm wide or so, and its numerous extensions protruded into the cytoplasmic layer. The sensory organ was composed of a small vesicle of 1.7 × 1.1 µm in dimensions, which possessed a cilium of 1.2 × 0.19 µm in size. The pharynx was composed of the epithelial layer of about 0.5 µm wide, well developed muscle layer and basement layer. The tegument of the oral sucker was composed of a cytoplasmic layer of 0.4-0.5 µm width, a narrow basement layer, a well developed muscle layer and tegumental cells. Some kinds of secretory granules that seemed to be originated from the cells of the oral sucker were observed in the parenchymal portions of the adjacent cells. The tribocytic organ consisted of numerous microvilli. The microvilli were 5 nm wide and heptalaminated. Two types of secretory granules originated from the gland cells of tribocytic organ were observed in the tegument and parenchyme. The tegumental cells were irregular in shape, and of which nuclei were multifarious.

Figures


Figs. 1-3
Fig. 1. The tegument of a metacercaria showing spines (S), nasement layer (BL), circular (CM) and longitudinal muscle bundles (LM), cytoplasmic tbule (CT), and a nucleus (N) in a tegumental cell. × 10,000. Fig. 2. A ciliated sensory organ in the cytoplasmic layer of a 4-day old worm, which consist of a vesicle bearing a cilium, 4-6 mitochondriae (M), numerous vacuoles, granular material (in circle) and septate desmosome (arrow heads). × 4,000. Fig. 3. The tegument on the anterior body of a 4-day old worm showing spins (S), sensory vesicle (arrow mark), basement layer (BL), processes of basement layer (arrow heads) and muscle layers. × 0,000.


Figs. 4-6
Fig. 4. The diagrammatic representation of Fig. 3. × 24,000. Fig. 5. The tegument on the posterior body of a 9-day old worm. × 10,000. Fig. 6. The tegument on the out-surface of the tribocytic organ of a 9-day old worm, showing the spine (S), extensions of basement layer (arrow heads), circular (CM) and longitudinal muscle layer (LM). × 15,000.


Figs. 7-10
Fig. 7. The tegument of the pharynx showing epitherial layer (EL), pharyngeal lumen (PL) and well developed muscle bundles. × 10,000. Fig. 8. The opposite protion of the pharyngeal lumen. Note the basement layer with highly laminated extensions (arrow heads). × 15,000. Fig. 9. A portion of oral sucker in a metacercaria, which composed of a cytoplasmic layer (CL), a narrow basement layer, well developed muscle layer and tegumental cells with a electron-dense nucleus (N). × 10,000. Fig. 10. A protion of oral sucker of a 9-day old worm showing well developed and compacted muscle fibers. × 10,000.


Figs. 11-14
Fig. 11. The electron-dense secretory granules in the parenchymal portion of a metacercaria, which seemed to be originated from the cells in the oral sucker. × 5,000. Fig. 12. Two type of secretory granules in the shoulder region of the oral sucker. × 11,250. Fig. 13. The electron-lucent secretory granules in the cytoplasmic portion of the oral sucker. × 15,000. Fig. 14. A part of ventral sucker showing well developed muscle bundles and tegumental cell, which contained numerous mitochondriae and polysomes. × 11,250.


Figs. 15-16
Fig. 15. The transverse sectional view of the chambered microvillous structure in the tribocytic organ. × 15,000. Fig. 16. The magnification of a portion in Fig. 15. Note the heptalaminated structure. × 41,000.


Figs. 17-18
Fig. 17. The diagrammatic representation of the tribocytic organ. Note the muscle layer (ML), basement layer (BL), cytoplasmic layer (CL) and microwillous structures. × 15,000. Fig. 18. The diagrammatic representation of the tribocytic organ, showing the chambered microvilli, numerous secretory granules and relatively large-sized mitochondriae. × 12,000.


Figs. 19-20
Fig. 19. The tegumental cells in the parenchyme of a 9-day old worm, showing the chromatin patches in the oval-shaped nucleus (N) and numerous mitochondriae (M) in the cytoplasm. × 10,000. Fig. 20. The tegumental cell in oral sucker of a 4-day old worm showing the eccentric nucleolus in the round-shaped nucleus (N) and numerous mitochondriae (M) and ribosomes in the cytoplasm. × 12,000.

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