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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 27(3):1989 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1989 Sep;27(3):177-186. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1989.27.3.177
Copyright © 1989 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Studies on the cell-mediated immunity in experimental Naegleria spp. infections
S G Lee,H J Shin and K I Im
Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine and Institute of Tropical Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752, Korea.
Abstract

Observations were made on the differences in cell-mediated immune responses in the mice infected with strongly pathogenic Naegleria fowleri ITMAP 359, weakly pathogenic Naegleria jadini 0400, or non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi EGB, respectively. Variations in cell-mediated responses and changes in antibody titers according to the duration after infection were noted. Infections were done by dropping 5 µls saline suspension containing 10 × 10(4) trophozoites cultured axenically in the CGVS medium into the right nasal cavity of ICR mice aging about 6-7 weeks, under the anesthesia by intraperitoneal injection of secobarbital. Following infection, delayed type hypersensitivity(DTH) responses in the footpad and blastogenic responses of the mouse spleen cells using [3H]-thymidine were observed on the day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14 after infection. For the preparation of amoeba lysates, each of cultured trophozoites were homogenized with an ultrasonicator, and centrifugated at 20,000 g. The supernatants of amoeba lysates were used as the mitogen and antigen for ELISA. Concanavalin A(Con. A) and lipopolysaccharide(LPS) were also used as mitogens in the blastogenic response. 1. The mice infected with N. fowleri showed the mortality rate of 75.7%. The rate was 6.2% for the N. jadini infected group, while no dead mouse was observed for N. gruberi infections. 2. In regard to DTH responses in the N. fowleri infected mice, the level increased in comparison to the control group but declined after 7 days. An increase was also noted for the N. jadini group after 1 day, but gradual decreases were observed through the infection period. In addition, no difference was noted between the N. gruberi infected and control groups. 3. Concerning the blastogenic response of the splenocytes, it increased after 10 days in the experimental group of N. fowleri infection, but the differences were not statistically significant compared with control group. It was evident that N. jadini group was not different from control group either, while there was a tendency of decrease in N. gruberi infected group. In regard to the blastogenic response of the splenocytes by LPS, it was found that the N. fowleri, N. jadini and N. gruberi infected groups had no differences from the control group. 4. The serum antibody titer of N. fowleri and N. jadini infected mice increased from the day 7 and 14 after infection respectively, while the N. gruberi infected mice showed no increase.

Figures


Fig. 1
Survival tate in the mice inoculated intranasally with N. fowleri, N. jadini, or N. gruberi.


Fig. 2
DTH levels obtained in response to subcutaneous injection with each amoeba lysate in the mice infected with N. fowleri, N. jadini, or N. gruberi (Inf.-BSA; infection-bovine serum albumin, Cont.-BSA; Control-bovine serum albumin).


Fig. 3
Stimulation index of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. fowleri infected mice


Fig. 4
Stimulation index of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. jadini infected mice.


Fig. 5
Stimulation index of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. gruberi infected mice.


Fig. 6
IgG antibody level of sera in the mice infected intranasally with N. fowleri, N. jadini, or N. gruberi.

Tables


Table 1
Mortality of the mice inoculated intranasally with N. fowleri, N. jadini, or N. gruberi


Table 2
DTH levels obtained in response to subcutaneous injection with each amoeba lysate in the mice infected with N. fowleri, N. jadini, or N. gruberi


Table 3
Stimulation index* (blastogenic response) of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. fowleri infected mice


Table 4
Stimulation index* (blastogenic response) of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. jadini infected mice


Table 5
Stimulation index* (blastogenic response) of mitogen-treated splenocytes from non-infected (control) and N. gruberi infected mice

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