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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 27(2):1989 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1989 Jun;27(2):79-86. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1989.27.2.79
Copyright © 1989 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Resistance to Naegleria fowleri infection passively acquired from immunized splenocyte, serum or milk
M H Ahn and D Y Min
Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
Abstract

A pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis to human and experimental animals. This infection is rare, but the mortality is very high. Nowadays, drug treatment or active immunization of human or mice are being tried with partial effectiveness. This study shows passive immunization effect by transfer of immunized spleen cells, serum, or milk from immunized mother in mouse experimental model. Young BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 2-3 × 10(6) trophozoites of N. fowleri, and spleen cells and sera were collected for injection to recipient mice. There were seven transfer groups, i.e., immunized mouse serum, spleen cells, serum and spleen cells, normal mouse serum, spleen cells, serum and spleen cells, and control group. Three days later, BALB/c mice were inoculated with 1 × 10(4) trophozoites of N. fowleri intranasally. After infection, decreased mortality and prolonged survival time of mice were noted in immunized groups compared with non-immunized control group. The groups injected with immunized spleen cells or normal serum showed lower mortality than that of controls but showed no changes of serum IgG level. The groups injected with immunized serum or normal spleen cells showed increased serum IgG level after immunization but hundred percent mortality was observed. Mother mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 2-3 × 10(6) trophozoites of N. fowleri at the end of pregnancy and weaning period. Soon after the delivery, litters born of non-immunized mother were matched with immunized mother for feeding immune milk. After three weeks, the litters were infected with 1 × 10(4) trophozoites of N. fowleri or sacrificed for serum collection to measure the IgG levels.

Figures


Fig. 1
Survival rate of BALB/c mice injected with immunized serum or spleen cells. [G(1)A: immunized serum injection, G(1)B: immunized spleen cell injection, G(1)C: immunized serum and spleen cell injection]


Fig. 2
Survival rate of BALB/c mice injected with normal serum or spleen cells. [G(II)A: normal serum injection, G(II)B: normal spleen cell injection, G(II)C: normal serum and spleen cell injection]


Fig. 3
Anti-N. fowleri IgG and IgA antibodies in the sera of 3-week old offspring mice. [Group I : Born of non-immunized mother, but fed from immunized mother, Group II : Born of immunized mother, but fed from non-immunized mother, Group III : Born of non-immunized mother, and fed from non-immunized mother]


Fig. 4
Anti-N. fowleri IgG and IgA antibodies in the stomach content (milk) of 3-week old offspring mice. [Group I : Born of non-immunized mother, but fed from immunized mother, Group II : Born of immunized mother, but fed from non-immunized mother, Group III : Born of non-immunized mother, and fed from non-immunized mother]

Tables


Table 1
Mortality and survival time of BALB/c mice injected with immunized mouse serum, spleen cells, normal mouse serum, or spleen cells before N. fowleri infection


Table 2
Mortality and survival time of N.fowleri-infected mice that were fed immunized or non-immunized milk


Table 3
Anti-N. fowleri antibody (IgG) levels in the sera of donor or recipient mice as measured by ELISA technique


Table 4
Anti-N. fowleri IgG and IgA antibody titers in serum and milk by ELISA technique (mean±S.E.)

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