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Korean J Parasitol > Volume 5(1):1967 > Article

Original Article
Korean J Parasitol. 1967 Jun;5(1):17-34. English.
Published online Mar 20, 1994.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.1967.5.1.17
Copyright © 1967 by The Korean Society for Parasitology
Studies on the intradermal reactions with the fractions of Ascaris lumbricoides
Chan-Wook Lee, M.D.
Department of Parasitology, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Korea.
Abstract

The intradermal studies with the fraction of Ascaris lumbricoides and Toxocara canis were performed to human and dog, and the following results were observed.

1) Wheal and erythema were appeared in the cases of ascaris infection or who had past history, but not in the ascaris free before.

2) The size of wheal reached to peak 30 minutes after the injection.

3) The crude antigen had specificity and showed no cross reaction.

4) The crude antigen cause the strongest and largest reaction than the other substances; protein, polysaccharide and the mixed antigen. No cutaneous reaction was observed with the fraction of polysaccharides.

5) The size of wheal did not parallel with the worm burden.

6) The skin reaction was appeared four weeks after the infection.

Figures


Fig. 1
Occurrence rate of positive wheal reaction to various antigen in Ascaris lumbricoides egg positive persons.


Fig. 2
Occurrence rate of positive erythematous reaction to various antigen in Ascaris lumbricoides egg positive persons.


Fig. 3
Correlation between degree of wheal and degree of erythematous reaction after intradermal test with crude antigen.


Fig. 4
Correlation between degree of wheal and degree of erythematous reaction after intradermal test with mixed antigen.


Fig. 5
Correlation between degree of wheal and degree of erythematous reaction after intradermal test with protein antigen.


Fig. 6
Correlation between degree of wheal and degree of erythematous reaction after intradermal test with polysaccharide antigen.


Fig. 7
Positive wheal reaction 30 min after intradermal injection of various antigen according to each group.


Fig. 8
Occurrence rate of wheal reaction after intradermal injection of crude antigen according to each group.


Fig. 9
Occurrence time of positive reaction after intradermal injection of crude antigen of Toxocara canis in dogs.


Appendix Fig. 1
Immediately after injection of various antigens (Left side).


Appendix Fig. 2
Fifteen min after injection of various antigens.


Appendix Fig. 3
Thirty min after injection of various antigens.


Appendix Fig. 4
Dog A. 1: Injection area of crude antigen, 2: Injection area of protein antigen, 3: Injection area of polysaccharide antigen.


Appendix Fig. 5
Dog B. 1: Injection area of crude antigen, 2: Injection area of protein antigen, 3: Injection area of polysaccharide antigen.


Appendix Fig. 6
Dog C. 1: Injection area of crude antigen, 2: Injection area of protein antigen, 3: Injection area of polysaccharide antigen.

Tables


Table 1
Number of examinee of intradermal skin test with Ascaris lumbricoides antigen according to group


Table 2
Infection rate of intestinal parasites according to group


Table 3
Positive criteria of intradermal test based on wheal


Table 4
Wheal reaction after intradermal test with various antigens in 58 Ascaris lumbricoides egg positive persons


Table 5
Erythematous reaction after intradermal test with various antigens in 58 Ascaris lumbricoides egg positive persons


Table 6
Result of intradermal test with various antigens in 54 Ascaris lumbricoides egg positive persons


Table 7
Result of intradermal test with various antigens in 35 Ascaris lumbricoides egg negative persons, suspected to be infected with Ascaris lumbricoides


Table 8
Result of intradermal test with in 15 Ascaris lumbricoides false negative persons


Table 9
Correlation between worm-burden of Ascaris lumbricoides and the reaction to intradermal test


Table 10
Cross reaction between various antigens of Toxocara canis and those of Ascaris lumbricoides


Table 11
Degree of reaction to Toxocara canis crude antigen in dog infected with Toxocara canis according to post-infection period

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